Teach 100

A Daily Ranking of Education Blogs

Top Ten

#2: TeachThought

TeachThought’s mantra is simple: learn better.

Our mission is modest enough–to create a modern enlightenment that results in healthy communities and truly interdependent citizens.

We believe that this can happen much more simply than it’d seem. The secret is to change the way people think about learning. It’s possible more than ever to create learning spaces that are personalized, self-directed, social, and rigorous.

This requires new tools and models, but more importantly a paradigm shift in how people thinking of the learning process–and all people, not just educators. Because in the 21st century, we’re all educators.

And we all can learn better.

Process

In pursuit, we’re starting small. Some blogging, some networking, and some curriculum for starters, followed up with a brick-and-mortar school, and an open-source school model that can be adapted to fit local needs.

Our pathway beyond that involves content, apps, and the kind of connectivity that can reach anyone on the planet at any given time—and in the process replacing consumption with production, and making it cool again to be smart.

What Makes TeachThought Different?

There are a lot of great blogs and organizations out there. What makes TeachThought unique is our macro view of the learning process, from culture and community to specific classroom practice.

TeachThought is a fluid platform that explores the best in learning innovation. We connect K-20 educators not only with resources and ideas, but models, frameworks and curricula. Many blogs cover progressive education and trending topics, but TeachThought also seeks to support the implementation of innovative learning.

Background

It is our position that all learning should result in substantive personal and social change. Our ideas are heavily influenced from a wide variety of thinkers, from Wendell Berry to Edward Wilson, David Hume to Henry David Thoreau, Jean Paul Sarte to Jeremy Bentham, Bena Kallick to Art Costa, Ken Robinson to Daniel Pink, Maria Popova to Grant Wiggins–and countless souls in between.

This concept includes, among other ideas, the relationship between culture, communities, and the institutions and curriculum purported to serve them, as well as emerging technologies and media.

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